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Abbeyleix Baby Linen Society 1845

Sitting in the National Library of Ireland in the Manuscripts section is an account book of the Abbeyleix Baby Linen Society, started in 1845, by Lady Emma Vesey, Viscountess de Vesci, the wife of Thomas Vesey, the 3rd Viscount of Abbeyleix. The legacy of Lady Emma is notable,...
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Handmade with care call for submissions

‘Handmade with Care’

***Pop-up Exhibition*** This coming Spring we will be launching a pop-up exhibition entitled ‘Handmade with Care’. We are looking for people to submit a work of handmade craft, either made by themselves or that has been held in their family as an heirloom. If you, or...
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How Abbeyleix looked in 1840

What the Maps Can Tell us? At Heritage House we have a collection of Original First Edition Ordinance Survey Maps from 1839/41, which show us the entire county of Laois at a scale of 6 inches to one mile. The Ordinance Survey was established in 1824, under the direction of...
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The Cashel Bog Body, A Bronze Age King of Laois

On Wednesday 10th of August 2011, a remarkable find was uncovered on a bog in Co. Laois. A bog body was unearthed during peat milling at Cashel bog between Portlaoise and Abbeyleix by Jason Phelan, a Bord Na Mona worker. After over two years of analysis, it was revealed that the...
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Sensation and Presence in Francis Bacon

  To take sensation and presence as concepts through which to look at Bacon’s art seems appropriate given his recurrent concern with pure feeling in his subjects and with his characteristic rendering or dismembering of the human form. In much of his work we experience...
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The 6th Viscount de Vesci’s Struggle in WW2

  John Eustace Vesey the 6th Viscount de Vesci of Abbeyleix was born in 1919, the only son of three children from the marriage of Colonel Hon. Thomas Eustace Vesey and Lady Cecily Kathleen Browne. He inherited the title of Viscount on the death of his uncle Ivo Richard de...
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Reason Crushed by the Infernal Dance: Bacon’s Study for a Bullfight No. 1 (c.1969).

  In much of Bacon’s work, and certainly in the present painting, there seems to be an exemplification of the nineteenth-century French poet, Arthur Rimbaud’s advocacy of the deregulation of the senses in order to achieve free understanding. This does not merely...
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Bacon, Expressionism and ‘Inexpressivity’.

  Francis Bacon visited Weimar Berlin in 1927 at the age of 18 accompanied by a certain Harcourt-Smith at the behest of Francis’ father. At the time Germany had entered a retrospectively-termed ‘golden age’ after World War I, subsequent political turmoil...
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Bacon’s Three Studies for a Portrait of Henrietta Moraes(1963) A Laois Connection

Undertaking a profane career that encompassed amphetamine-psychotic cat burglary in the ’60s for which she served prison time, Henrietta Moraes was the epitome of willful caprice and bohemianism throughout her adventurous life. Initially emerging in Soho pubs such as the...
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